MYAR_RE_ALOHA_BANNER.jpg

MYAR SS20COLLECTION / RE_ALOHA / PRESENTS

GBJ91

BRITISH CAMOUFLAGE JACKET - 1990’S


GBJ91_FRONT.jpg
GBJ91_BACK.jpg

PRESENT

British camouflage shirt with half body vintage Hawaiian aloha shirt applied on front and pocket detail.

The aloha shirt of the insert will have a placed graphic and will always be different depending on availability.

Cotton polyester


MYAR_PAST_GBJ91_4.jpg
MYAR_PAST_GBJ91_5.jpg
MYAR_PAST_GBJ91_6.jpg

PAST

Disruptive Pattern Material (DPM) is the commonly used name of a camouflage pattern used by the British Armed Forces as well as many other armies worldwide, particularly in former British colonies such as Kenya.

The main variants of DPM are a four-colour woodland pattern, and desert patterns in two, three or four colours. The Woodland Pattern DPM was used with the medium weight No.8 Temperate Combat Dress (c.1966/1968) and lightweight No.9 Tropical Combat Dress (c.1976). The later Desert Pattern DPM (c.late 1980s) was designated the No.5 Desert Combat Dress.

DPM has also been produced in black/white/grey Urban DPM, in various blue tones and even in purples (this last for the Swazi Royal Guard).

DPM has been phased out in British military service, superseded by Multi-Terrain Pattern (MTP).


 
GBJ91_SACHET.jpg
 

MYAR commitment is to bring back to life past used military garments that have been stocked for long time in darkened warehouse, bringing back the light in the present time, for a second life in a civil environment. 

The up-cycling process involving MYAR is not only an aesthetic intervention but also a process of historical knowledge

On each garment is applied a QR code that, once scanned, will tell the historical origin of the piece and the type of workmanship that has been made.

This process of customization is also witnessed by a small white cloth sachet containing scraps of fabrics: a part of the past of this garment, which has been modified from the original to be worn today for the future coming.


MYAR a modern view of the past